The Principles of Minimalist Interior Design and Decor



In House Stuff | |

For those who work in the field, minimalism and feng shui can go together like peanut butter and jelly. And yet, as previously discussed in another post, and in the book Modern Minimalism, feng shui is just one facet of minimalism and minimalism is not feng shui. But where a designer is in the game of feng shui, they can play it, or they can turn their back and walk away.

The new casinos which have physical premises likely have in-house hotels from which some visual inspiration can be drawn, but otherwise what are the principles of minimalist interior design and decor?

The all-inclusive (but qualified) definition of minimalist interior design is “a state of harmony and balance among details, emotions, and physical forces within the home or its surrounding environment, in which beauty is used as a catalyst for meaningful interaction.” We used to describe ourselves as minimalist, and our interior design style. We said we were trying to find the “sweet spot” between function and form. We wanted to be inclusive in our spaces. We wanted to facilitate not only the way that you see the world, but also the way that you feel.

Here are the three essential principles of a modern minimalist interior design, according to Kristin Hulshof, a manager at Caruso Interiors. Hulshof co-authored Modern Minimalism and also teaches a class on the subject called The Modern Minimalist Home and Life.

The Beauty Principle: To decorate your home, you need to make it beautiful and cohesive, rather than themed. Not every room in your home needs to look the same.

To decorate your home, you need to make it beautiful and cohesive, rather than themed. Not every room in your home needs to look the same.

The Emotion Principle: Create feelings within your home and home space. A good living room should make you feel welcome. Don’t go with “everything must be red” or “every room must have a fireplace.” It’s about “meandering” through your home to a “well-balanced” place.

Create feelings within your home and home space. A good living room should make you feel welcome. Don’t go with “everything must be red” or “every room must have a fireplace.” It’s about “meandering” through your home to a “well-balanced” place. The Physical Principle: It should feel “full,” both of space and of its elements. Using fresh colours, textures, and patterns throughout the house is a simple way to achieve this.

The Physical Principle: Make your home look full. Fill the house with natural light. If you have direct sunlight on your house, then you need to make sure that your windows are large enough to let in the sun’s rays. Make sure you’ve positioned your furniture and artwork in the most beautiful spots. Let light and beauty flow through your home. These basic principles are easily applied in any room in your house. The best minimalist interior design combines function, beauty, and comfort. But more than anything, it’s about looking and feeling at home. When you can do that, it’s an interior design you can be proud of.